The Healing Powers of Ginger

Ginger is beneficial for many ailments. If you are like me, you love the taste of ginger in just about anything. The fact that it is also incredibly good for you is an added perk! Ginger comes in many forms. Let’s review these, shall we?

Powdered ginger from the spice aisle. I have to admit I never use this unless I’m cooking at someone else’s house and they are lacking in fresh spices. I can never tell that I’ve added this spice when I used the powder.

Crystallized ginger is a favorite in our house. I chew these after big meals or whenever I have stomach upset. They make for a great bedtime snack when you don’t have desserts on hand or don’t want to eat a dessert late at night. The sugar coating gives me a bit of guilt. However, the spicy-sweet combination thrills me!

Fresh ginger root is a staple in my fridge. Some leave this root on the counter but in our house, in Florida. everything molds if left out for too long. Grate a little bit at a time after first removing the outer covering. I add to boiling water and steep to make tea. I add this to stir-fry veggies and for homemade marinades for poultry and fish.

Powdered ginger capsules are sold in health food stores and pharmacies. When you are suffering from arthritis or a long-term illness, taking 2-4 capsules daily can reduce symptoms.

Ginger syrup can be made ahead of time and stored in your fridge for up to 4-6 weeks. Add this to tea and ice cream. Poke holes in cakes and pour this syrup directly in.

Fresh or bottled ginger juice is sold in shots from Suja and other fresh juice manufacturers. When you need a quick immune boost you can drink this spicy drink fast. When added to tea or juice the flavor isn’t as strong but you still get all of the wonderful benefits.

Gingerale and ginger beer are not the same. Gingerale has minuscule amounts of real ginger in each container if they even have it at all. Not all brands are the same. Ginger beer is known to have higher concentrations of ginger. The amounts differ with each brand. Be aware of the high sugar content in each of these tasty, carbonated beverages. They make great mixers for cocktails and mocktails but don’t count on them to provide much in the way of health benefits.

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What can ginger help you with?

  • Joint pain
  • Arthritis
  • Nausea
  • Boost immunity
  • Digestion

Joint pain and arthritis are no fun! While there are many natural remedies and therapies you can employ to relieve joint pain, ginger is widely known to help soothe achy joints. The anti-inflammatory properties of ginger help to relieve pain and improve function for those suffering from arthritis symptoms. Using up to four grams of ginger daily is safe to consume.

One 2000 study found that ginger extract was as effective as ibuprofen in the first treatment period of a cross-over study.”

Healthline article: Ginger for Arthritis: Should I give it a try? 3/27/17
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Muscle pain can lessen with ginger. Knee pain and pain from exercise can reduce pain and inflammation. You can apply creams and gels that have ginger in them to help with muscle aches and pains.

Nausea is a common symptom in pregnancy and for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Ginger chews and candied ginger can be carried in a backpack or purse easily. These candies have a long shelf life and do not require refrigeration. If you are pregnant, it is advised to not ingest more than 1.2 grams of ginger per day.

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Boosting immunity is more important than ever during these times. We went from almost being out of flu season to stepping into the throes of a major epidemic with COVID-19. Ingesting ginger in all forms will strengthen your immunity. Ginger is not only an antioxidant, but it also has anti-cancer properties.

Ginger is a strong antioxidant that has been shown to naturally boost the immune system. It contains tons of vitamins, some of which are magnesium, iron, zinc, and calcium. Ginger helps kill cold viruses and has been said to combat chills and fever. It is also a great detox — ginger root helps relax the intestinal tract and eliminate intestinal gas.”

The Active Times
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Digestion and heartburn relief can come from taking ginger regularly. If you are plagued with these unpleasant symptoms often, consider adding freshly grated ginger to cooked meals and salads. Drinking shots of ginger juice and eating candied ginger are simple ways to have more ginger while traveling away from home.

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Research shows ginger may help to treat and prevent the following:

  • Migraines
  • Diabetes
  • Bacterial infection
  • Tumors
  • Cancer
  • Ulcers (Same article from Healthline)

You, Me, and Uni teas are both delicious with added ginger:

Grate fresh ginger in a small pot of water (1 cup) and bring to a boil. Reduce to simmer after boiling, for 20-30 minutes. Strain the tea and store in the refrigerator to add to Meditative State of Mind or Trust Your Gut, Know Your Gut Uni teas. Honey is wonderful when added to teas containing ginger to curb the spicy flavor.

Order Meditative State of Mind and Trust Your Gut, Know Your Gut teas directly from Amazon. Drink them iced or hot, with or without ginger for a refreshing tea experience.

Anastacia Elizabeth Walden is a writer and editor living in Gainesville, Florida. She has a background in midwifery with a focus on nutrition and natural remedies.

Walden Writes For Women website

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